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  • Aberdeen Vision Therapy Centre

    Aberdeen Vision Therapy Centre, Jenson & Ledingham, 23 Belmont St, Aberdeen AB10 1JS01224 643557

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    Mild traumatic brain injury, stroke, etc

     

    How does concussions, brain injury or stroke affect vision

     

    • Firstly it may not affect eye sight,
    • it will rarely cause a change in spectacle prescription

     

    However Concussions can have the following effects on the visual system:

    • Reduced visual field - Reduced ability to process peripheral information, may have loss of part of field of vision which can affect both eyes
    • Accommodative Insufficiency – This condition is a reduction in eye focusing ability that results in blurry vision at near, even in young athletes.  Near vision may be constantly blurry or may pulse in and out of clarity during near activities like reading.
    • Blurry Vision - Blurry vision following a concussion can occur at distance, near or both.
    • Convergence Insufficiency – This inability to use the eyes comfortably at near can result in a number of symptoms including: headaches, eyestrain, fatigue or even double vision during near activities.
    • Double Vision – There are several causes of double vision, which is why anyone who sees double (even intermittently) should be evaluated by an optometrist with advanced training in neuro-optometry, binocular vision and vision therapy.
    • Light Sensitivity – Photophobia, or light sensitivity, can result from various types of acquired brain injuries (including concussions).
    • Ocular-Motor Dysfunction – Deficiencies in eye movement abilities are quite common following concussions and other forms of mild traumatic brain injuries.  These eye movement deficits can pose challenges with many activities of daily life, including reading and driving.
    • Reduced Cognitive Abilities With Visual Tasks - Visual perceptual deficits can be caused by concussions and have dramatic effects on academic and even athletic success.
    • Reduced Visual Processing Speed or Reaction Time – Prolonged visual processing speed can slow down an athlete both on and off the field.  The speed with which an athlete processes visual information affects many aspects of athletic competition, including: reading the field of play, judging the speed of a moving ball or puck, and judging the speed of other players on the field.
    • Balance difficulties – because perception of space can be affected, this can lead to postural and balance distortions that affect the ability to move and walk

    NORA

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